Neuroethics: the delicate balance of neuroscience and morality

Pew pew pewHow can we create frameworks of practical moral reasoning in the absence of free will? Can neuroscience research shed light on how we make moral judgements? What are the general implications of neuroscience research itself? How can we differentiate between the study of the mind or the brain to begin with? In the … Continue reading Neuroethics: the delicate balance of neuroscience and morality

"The pursuit of truth," a villanelle

Truth is elusive, nowhere to be found. Footprint and forecast, through reason and verse, through scars and marks that style the ground. Memory and reason, fade to the bland. Glimpse of light, the sight of truth. We converse scratched in concrete or scribbled in sand. From birthmark or gravestone, the discourse abound, of dialogue, debating, … Continue reading "The pursuit of truth," a villanelle

On becoming a better researcher

"Only passions, great passions can elevate the soul to great things." - Denis Diderot, Pensées PhilosophiquesI believe the ways we become better researchers only come through self-reflection and meditating upon the arguments and principles behind what we do - not the simple acts of doing those things themselves. What makes good work that we find satisfying, … Continue reading On becoming a better researcher

History transcending science’s boundaries

Voltaire When I attended the 2019 meeting of the American Association of Advancement of Science, I couldn’t help but feel déjà vu. At my second AAAS conference, I found familiar faces among scientists and journalists. I also felt the conference’s theme “Science Transcending Boundaries” resonating with centuries-old writing that has remained relevant to this day.  … Continue reading History transcending science’s boundaries

Guest post – "Aristotle and Fake News: Why understanding rhetoric illuminates credible arguments"

By Carolyn HaythornIt’s hard for me to remember the time before the internet became such a pervasive part of daily life. I work online to earn money, watch Netflix to relax, scroll YouTube for advice on anything from personal finance to cooking, and read push notifications from my favorite news outlets to keep up-to-date. I’m … Continue reading Guest post – "Aristotle and Fake News: Why understanding rhetoric illuminates credible arguments"

Artificial intelligence re-defines reality and the self

Is this strong AI? Is this just fantasy? Caught in a human mind. No escape from reality.When the Cold War brought the world's attention to revolutions in scientific research, artificial intelligence would shake our understanding of what separates a human from the rest of the world. Scientists and philosophers would draw from theories of mind … Continue reading Artificial intelligence re-defines reality and the self

The beauty of logic throughout history

Kurt GödelAs I peruse through biographies of the lives of philosophers, scientists, mathematicians, and other researchers, I find myself fascinated. I wonder how their hometowns, education backgrounds, and people they've met throughout their lives influenced their success in their work. In investigating what it means to be a genius and what it takes to produce … Continue reading The beauty of logic throughout history

Creating a greater story of artificial intelligence

With my new site A History of Artificial Intelligence, I share a story with over sixty events from the present day dating back to ancient civilizations. The way humans have created artificial intelligence such as self-driving cars and algorithms that recommend books to read has a lot of history behind it. Spanning literature, art, poetry, philosophy, … Continue reading Creating a greater story of artificial intelligence

"Frankenstein" and tampering with nature

From the 1831 revised edition of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, published by Colburn and Bentley, London.Frankenstein by English novelist Mary Shelley: with philosophy, literature, science, and history, Shelley speculated how humans would attempt to use scientific progress to tamper with nature as far back as 1818. Frankenstein and his rejected monster remain central to debates about … Continue reading "Frankenstein" and tampering with nature